Eight chairs, three lamps & one table/ the nature of reality (2014) | Tessa R. Groenewoud

  • Eight chairs, three lamps & one table/ the nature of reality (2014)
  • Eight chairs, three lamps & one table/ the nature of reality (2014)
  • Eight chairs, three lamps & one table/ the nature of reality (2014)
  • Eight chairs, three lamps & one table/ the nature of reality (2014)
  • Eight chairs, three lamps & one table/ the nature of reality (2014)
  • Eight chairs, three lamps & one table/ the nature of reality (2014)
  • Eight chairs, three lamps & one table/ the nature of reality (2014)
  • Eight chairs, three lamps & one table/ the nature of reality (2014)
  • Eight chairs, three lamps & one table/ the nature of reality (2014)
  • Eight chairs, three lamps & one table/ the nature of reality (2014)
  • Eight chairs, three lamps & one table/ the nature of reality (2014)

Eight chairs,
three lamps
& one table/ the nature of reality

installation (projector, glass base 80x50x50cm, plexiglass frames 10x10cm, found photographs, screen)

Tumultingent, Witte Moor, Ghent (BE) 2014

In the installation two plexiglass frames are positioned on a glass base. In the frames small black and white photographs show empty livingroom-interiors. Into these, sequences of slowly and at times fast spinning objects are projected by a beamer on a tripod just next to the glass base.

A text on a small screen on the wall describes, sentence by sentence, an annunciation painting by Sicilian Renaissance painter Antonello. He was one of few who depicted the scene of the annunciation with hardly any reference to the interior setting, while the motive was in fact popular amongst artists as a means to depict domestic elements. More important in the painting seems to be the space in front of the canvas, for the viewer gets to play an important role. In a way he or she fullfills the position of the angel bringing the news and stands in direct confrontation with Mary.

As separate icons the multiple elements of the installation reflect on two great themes in European painting: the still-life and the annunciation.

The empty, objective, interchangeable images of the livingrooms, are combined and compressed with the moving images which refer to objects on display, as presented in commercials or shop windows. The ekphrasis or description of the painting on the screen plays with the absence of image and directly adresses the spectator.

An interplay of visualizing and connecting arises.